14
Jul/10
0

Could your HDMI cable soon be obsolete?

The HDBaseT cable combines audio and video signals, USB, network and even power into one single cable and is set to replace HDMI when it starts hitting shop shelves later this year.

The cable was designed by the HDBaseT alliance which represents a culmination of efforts from Sony, Samsung, LG and Valens. By combining all of the normal connections found in the home the companies hope to make the new industry standard. Most current generation displays will probably be incompatable due to their lack of an ethernet port which supports the cable. The HDBaseT alliance insists that new cables won’t need to be purchased due to the technology working with current network wiring, ethernet cables and an RJ-45 connector.

In an interview with ThinQ.co.uk a spokesman for the HDBaseT alliance explained that the cable allows “a network of sources – such as digital video recorders (DVR), Blu-ray disc players, game consoles, PCs and mobile devices – to be connected directly to displays in multiple locations”.

Current HDMI 1.4 cables allow sterescopic 3D signals to be sent to a TV as well as normal and high definition content. The HDBaseT is capable of doing the same but also adds the ability to use a 100Mb/sec ethernet connection and up to 100W of charging power.

The chairman of the HDBaseT Alliance, Ariel Sobelman hopes the cable will take over as the next generation TV standard.

“HDBaseT technology is poised to become the unrivaled next-generation home networking transport”

14
Jul/10
0

Sharp 3D spex downconvert to 2D

Aside from sitting around inventing names for new technologies – Quattron, Aquos, Quincy ME (probably) – Sharp boffins have devised something for their 3D TV technology that’s unique as far as Pocket-lint is concerned.

The new tech is actually in the glasses themselves, which match the manufacturer’s new Aquos Quattron 60-inch 3D TV, and allows them to downconvert 3D pictures back to 2D. Brilliant.

Before you go “eh?”, the explanation Sharp gave us makes complete sense: If you’re sat in a room with the whole family, and they’ve put on a 3D Blu-ray copy of, say, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, but you either a) are suffering with a headache, or b) are one of the 10 per cent of the population with a sight problem that renders 3D unwatchable, you can still watch the same movie, but with the 3D downconverted to 2D. Same film, different experience.

The only other alternatives are to leave the room or watch a screen (without glasses) that looks fuzzy and disjointed.

The mode can be switched off and on with the press of a button, so should you experience eye strain, or other symptoms that can appear during poorly rendered 3D content, you can just flick onto 2D until the problems subside.