20
Sep/10
0

iGo Portable Pico-Projector

Flip Video’s other notable partnership in the new Designed for Flip accessory program is iGo, who have put together a pico-projector for the company’s UltraHD and MinoHD camcorders.  Unlike the Mikey for Flip, which physically snaps onto the bottom of your Flip, the iGo Portable Projector uses an adapter cable; it also has regular A/V, composite video, stereo audio, mini HDMI, VGA and microUSB inputs.

                   igoportableprojectorflipvideo

That actually makes for a reasonable flexible pico-projector in its own right, and the iGo is capable of a 1200 x 800 picture in either 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratio and with 20 ANSI lumens brightness.

16
Sep/10
0

Wireless 7.1 HDMI audio – Summit Semiconductor

Summit Semiconductor and Hansong Technologies have teamed up to offer the first full 7.1 complaint HDMI wireless audio hub to home theater fans. The device is a small HDMI audio hub that has AV receiver connectivity and high definition audio decode capability. The device is aimed at use with digital TVs, Blu-ray players, game consoles, and more.

                    summit71wireless-sg

The device has optical and coax digital audio inputs and supports DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD audio format. It also has stereo analog inputs for devices like the Wii, iPhone, and MP3 players. The hub also has calibration features built in to optimize the sound for the room.

The hub is compatible with all Summit Wireless enabled speakers. Once set up and paired with the appropriate speakers the system can send audio wirelessly to speaker systems ranging from 2.0 to 7.1 so you don’t need to run wires all around your home.

15
Sep/10
0

3D Monitor from ASUS

ASUS’ VG236H was quietly announced back at CeBIT, but the 23-inch 3D monitor is just now getting around to making itself known to worldwide retailers. On sale now for a penny under $500 (which includes the complete $180 NVIDIA 3D Vision kit), this 1080p display has also managed to hit the test bench over at Hot Hardware. Critics over there found that it was amongst the nicest looking TN (boo) panels out there, and that the third dimension had no issue popping out on command. In fact, they had little to complain about, noting that it “consistently hit the mark in their testing [while producing] a fantastic image, whether it be 2D, 3D, work or play.” Granted, it’s not like you’ve too many options when it comes to snagging a 3D LCD, but at least we’re hearing this particular one is worth a look (or three).

Tagged as: , , , , ,
14
Sep/10
0

HDCP ‘master key’ unlocks HDTV copy protection permanently

Just as the MPAA is preparing to offer movies to customers at home while they’re still in theaters by limiting playback to DRM-protected digital outputs only, the HDCP protocol they rely on may have been cracked wide open. All devices that support HDCP, like Blu-ray players, set-top boxes and displays with HDMI inputs, have their own set of keys to encrypt and decrypt protected data and if keys for a particular device are compromised, they can be revoked by content released in the future which will then refuse to play. Now, posts have been floating around on Twitter about a supposed “master key” which renders that protection unusable since it allows anyone to create their own source and sink keys.

Who discovered this and by what technique isn’t immediately clear, but as early as 2001 security researcher Niels Ferguson proposed that it could be easily revealed by knowing the keys of less than 50 different devices. Hardware HDCP rippers like the HDfury2 and DVIMAGIC have been around for a while and various AACS cracks easily allow rips of Blu-ray discs but if this information is what it claims to be, then the DRM genie could be permanently out of the bag allowing perfect high definition copies of anything as long as the current connector standards are around. While it’s unlikely your average user would flash their capture device with a brand new key and get to copying uncompressed HD audio and video, keeping those early releases off of the torrents in bit perfect quality could go from difficult to impossible

12
Sep/10
0

Apple’s Mac Mini as skinny HDMI box

Apple has sliced roughly half of the metal off its old Mac Mini and re-released the starter computer as a box that now looks a lot like the Apple TV. And it has an HDMI port.

Does this mark the death knell for Apple’s “hobby” project, we wonder?

Like the Apple TV, the new Mini has an built-in power brick. Yet it measures 197 x 197 x 36mm.

As standard the new, slimmer Mini sports a 2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, 2GB of 1067MHz DDR 3 memory, 320GB Sata hard drive and Nvidia GeForce 320M graphics.

There’s an SD card slot on the back, plus four USB 2.0 ports and a Firewire 800 connector, Gigabit Ethernet and Mini DisplayPort. The machine has 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 2.1 too.

Apple said the power supply for Mac mini has been reduced from 110W to 85W and is now up to 90 per cent efficient.

The machine costs £649, and there’s a server version for £929. The latter lacks an optical drive, but contains two 500GB HDDs, 4GB of Ram and a 2.66GHz Core 2 Duo.

Same size as the Apple TV, has an HDMI port like the Apple TV – will the Mac Mini replace that machine? Well, it’s telling that the current verision of the Apple TV has been dropped from the front page of the online Apple Store.