19
Jan/10
0

JVC Tells the Story of Three Little Receivers

Those of you that are “lucky” enough to work very far away from home probably know what it means to spend many hours in a car. Without any sort of entertainment, the daily drive from and to work would be a painfully boring experience, so any type of media content is appreciated/recommended.

JVC mobile promises to improve your in-vehicle experience with three new multimedia receivers that have 7-inch touch panel screens and are compatible with the Universal Serial Bus 2.0 protocol for two-way iPod control. The most appraised receiver is the KW-AVX830 with its 7-band iEQ and detachable face. Formats such as WMV, MP3 or WAV should have no trouble running on the multimedia gadget that is gonna rock your driving. SAT and HD ready, the KW-AVX830 comes even with a wireless remote control.

Newly launched this year, the KW-AVX793 model is quite similar to the previous one and can be turned into a capable Bluetooth machine if used together with a KS-BTA200 adapter. It has just three sets of 5V pre-outs unlike the KW-AVX830, which has five of them.

The DVD/CD receiver that JVC Mobile outed last year, KW-AVX720, is back on the market with MOS-FET 50 watts x4 and Dolby Digital sound compatibility. It is also the cheapest of the three, at a MSRP of $499.95. Fortunately, it’s the only one available right away as you will have to wait for the first two models until March.

Although very similar in specs, you will be the one deciding whether the advantages every receiver has over the others is worth the price difference or not. KW-AVX830 costs $649.95, which is $100 USD more than the KW-AVX793.
 Multimedia receivers are more or less the ultimate solution when trying to avoid boredom on long trips. They can keep the children happy and bring a small dose of bling to your vehicle as well.

15
Jan/10
0

Even If You’re Running JVC’s HA-EB75 Earphones Will Stay on

There are a lot of people out there who simply love going out jogging in the morning or going to the gym and exercising while listening to their favorite music being played on their MP3 players. Unfortunately, most of these players’ standard earphones don’t provide a particular good level of stability for intense physical action, or, in simpler words, they tend to fall out of their users’ ears.

For this reason, JVC has brought to this year’s CES its HA-EB75 headphones, which feature an adjustable ear clip for increased security and comfort. Plus, in order to accommodate various customers’ tastes, the new JVC headphones are available in a choice of three different colors, namely blue, black and silver.

Designed for sports and other active uses, the JVC HA-EB75 splash-proof headphones incorporate a soft rubber ear clip that fits around the outer ear to hold the earbud in place. To ensure a comfortable and secure fit, the ear clip is adjustable, with a slide mechanism that offers five different positions to adjust to different size ears.

To ensure high quality sound reproduction, a 0.53-inch (13.5mm) neodymium driver in each earpiece provides powerful sound with bass boost earpieces to deliver enhanced audio quality. Also, the splash-proof design helps protect the headphones from the elements. The HA-EB75 come with a four-foot (1.2m) friction noise reduction cord and an iPhone-compatible plug.

Pricing for the new JVC headphones is quite interesting, making them more than affordable. So, according to the Japanese company, its HA-EB75 adjustable ear clip headphones are scheduled to officially arrive in stores at some point in February, pricing starting at a mere US $12.95. Pretty OK for a pair of headphones that will ensure a good fit pretty much wherever and whenever one might decide to use them, even while doing sports.

13
Jan/10
0

New HA-FXC80 Model of JVC’s

Along with the many other products recently announced, introduced, presented or launched, JVC also announced the addition of a pair of in-ears to its premium Black series headphone line. These are the new HA-FXC80 headphones that mix advanced materials and the company’s Micro-HD driver, all in a uniquely designed cabinet that ensures comfort and a secure fit.475413212121

What makes the headphones perform so well, firstly, is mainly the core, that JVC Micro-HD driver, that via development and design is placed in the ear canal, rather than the common placement in the housing outside the ear found in conventional designs. The only result I can find in this is that the wearer’s ear itself will act as the driver’s cabinet, ensuring a more detailed sound reproduction than what happens in other designs along with sound reflections. Also, the sound isolation from outside noise is improved.

A further improvement in the design is the use of a carbon housing and carbon diaphragm, so that overall, the HA-FXC80 headphones deliver crisp, clean sound and that desired and demanded solid and rich bass.The Tri-form design is what enables users to wear the headphones with the cord below the ear or, if they wish, to turn the housing so that the cord is wrapped over the top and behind the ear, ensuring a more secure fit, for jogging as an example.

Even better, the company included detachable soft ear loops for securing even more the over-the-ear placement of the cord, while for the optimum in-ear fit and close to zero sound leakage JVC was kind enough to include three sizes of soft silicon earpieces. With a gold-plated iPhone-compatible slim plug and 1.2m pure copper cord, the JVC HA-FXC80 headphones are available this month for $59.99.

28
Oct/09
0

JVC joins the Blu-ray player game

jvcblurayplayer

Sub-$200 Blu-ray players certainly aren’t new — heck, some guys have been doing it since the year 2008 — but you’ll never catch us kvetching about a little more competition. JVC has today introduced (in the briefest way possible, might we add) its newest Blu-ray player just ten months after deciding to play the BD game here in the States. The ultrathin (and “now available”) XV-BP11 should slide into just about any AV rack, bringing Blu-ray / DVD playback, AVCHD support, HDMI 1.3, a USB socket and compatibility with a slew of audio formats. Curiously enough, the outfit doesn’t bother to mention if this thing is Profile 2.0, but we’re guessing (read: hoping) that it wouldn’t do something as ludicrous as charge two bills for a Profile 1.1 deck in late 2009.

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25
Sep/09
0

JVC Picsio GC-FM1 video camera

jvcpicsiocamerahd

Sure, JVC’s new Picsio GC-FM1 pocket video camera has the specs to complete with the likes of Flip Video’s Ultra HD and other similar offerings (1080p video, 8-megapixel stills, a 2-inch LCD, and HDMI out), but it also has a little something extra, something rarely seen in the world of anthropomorphized products since they heyday of the California Raisins: showmanship. Still no word on a North American appearance just yet, unfortunately but it looks like the camera will run around ¥20,000 (or about $220) when it hits Japan by the end of the month. In the meantime, we’re sure the video after the break will more than tide you over.

15
Sep/09
0

3D Home Judgments on the Technology

3dtechnology

With the the big 3D push coming in 2010, I planted my eyes on three types of 3D technologies displayed at CEDIA (home theater expo) that you may have in your next TV…and passed some judgments without pulling any punches.

It should be noted, all designs require glasses.

Panasonic’s 3D Plasma Concept
The Tech: Plasma with Active Shutter (alternating left eye, right eye progressive frames)

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As a baseline reference to get our bearings, I took yet another look at Panasonic’s 103-inch plasma display that we’ve seen twice before. My original impressions stand. It’s decent—and definitely the best technology of the three that we saw at CEDIA. Why? There’s virtually no flicker in the image because of plasma’s instantaneous response times/ability to push legitimate high frame rates. Plus, it probably helps that we’re talking about a 103-inch display (that has its own trailer). The bigger a 3D display, the better the illusion. But glasses aside, it’s not what I’d deem a perfect experience. You see ghosting around some objects. And…OK, I still can’t ignore the damned glasses. It creates an inherent distance from the image inducing an unintentionally ephemeral viewing experience.

Sony’s LCD Concept
The Tech: 240Hz LCD with Active Shutter (alternating left eye, right eye progressive frames)

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Even Panasonic will tell you that 240Hz is the baseline speed needed for an LCD to pull off 3D. But you know what? 240Hz isn’t enough. Watching Pixar’s Up, the color and sharpness are both great, but there’s an absurd level of flicker that’s nominally better than on old timey crank projector. And on this normal-sized LCD, it’s incredibly obvious when 3D objects break the illusion by reaching the TV’s frame. Granted, we’re not talking about a final product here, but the specs seem pretty much identical to what consumers can expect to see in the high-end display market next year.

JVC’s GD-463D10 LCD
The Tech: Polarized filter (two images are interlaced on the screen, each eye sees half the data, glasses don’t need power)

3dtechnology3

Of the three technologies here, JVC’s is the only final product that’s actually available now. And it costs $9,153. It’s also easily the worst of the three—completely unwatchable, in fact. The interlaced 3D means that the resolution takes a huge hit. But it’s worse than just a 1080i picture. Your brain can almost make out these lines. I could say more about the tech, but I honestly couldn’t stand to look at the screen for more than 10 seconds at once. Oh, and the kicker? For nine thousand bucks, you still only get two pairs of the cheap, polarized glasses. Sorry kids, Mommy and Daddy are watching TV tonight.

There’s no doubt that some home theater enthusiasts will go out and plop down $5k or more on a commercially available 3D display when they enter the TV lines of major manufacturers like Sony and Panasonic in 2010. But I’m hoping, really hoping, that the public can resist the gimmick until the technology is perfected. To me, that means when we don’t need to deal with these silly glasses at all. But for whatever it’s worth, plasma is definitely looking like the clear front runner in execution.

10
Sep/09
0

JVC’s 4K DLA-RS4000 projector in your home

By and large, any 4K x 2K projector that we’ve seen — be it at CES, CEDIA or any other trade show — has been solely for looks. Oh sure, they’re for sale, but they’re only being sold to cinema owners and the select few that find themselves within the same tax bracket as Bill Gates and Lawrence Ellison. But the DLA-RS4000… the DLA-RS4000 is different. Introduced in Atlanta, the ultra high-definition projector spots a native resolution of 4,096 x 2,400, enabling it to display up to four screens of Full HD content (you listening, college football / NFL fans?) at once. Naturally, it’s fully ISF and THX certified, and it packs 3,500 ANSI lumens, a Xenon lamp, 10,000:1 contrast ratio, RSVP4 video processing unit, Ethernet port and an RS-232c control port. Interested in showing 1080p what’s really up? Great! Crack open that wallet and yank out $176,000 — $175,000 for the beamer, and a grand to rent the forklift you’ll need to get a 110 pound box into your home.

jvc4k2kprojectorshd

JVC Visual Systems Division introduces its new DLA-RS4000 Reference Series 4K home cinema projector at CEDIA Expo, September. 10-13 at the Georgia World Conference Center in Atlanta. The system is being showcased in the JVC D-ILA Theater in the Omni Hotel North Tower throughout the duration of the CEDIA Expo. Based on the same projection engine used in advanced simulation systems, it provides the superior imagery as well as installation flexibility required by uncompromising home theater consumers. This system is ISF and THX* certified.

 Three newly developed ultra high definition 4K2K D-ILA devices allow the DLA-RS4000 to deliver a 10 megapixel image with a native resolution of 4,096 x 2,400—more than four times the resolution of HD. Up to four screens with full HD or WUXGA resolution images can be displayed simultaneously .

 A new optical design provides 3500 ANSI lumens from a Xenon lamp and delivers excellent color rendering. Lamp power can be adjusted in eight steps for the ideal brightness for a variety of home theater settings and screen sizes. In addition, new Wire Grid polarizers in the optical engine that minimize light leakage are combined with new liquid crystal technology and a novel liquid crystal orientation to significantly reduce off-state light, resulting in a 10,000:1 native contrast ratio.

 The RSVP4 custom digital video processing unit serves as a signal switching, scaling and processing hub for virtually any video source, including Blu-ray and gaming systems, cable and satellite receivers, and DVD players. The RSVP4 has a special feature enabling certified calibration specialists to calibrate either of two custom gamut memories based on the installation’s specific requirements. This enables each system to achieve an accurate color space for the source material being shown. Other features include audio delay compensation, and three separate gamma tables for customization of various image sources and viewing environments. The DLA-RS4000 is shipped complete with a JVC high quality projection zoom lens to maximize performance in almost any home theater setting.

 Despite its advanced performance, the 110-pound DLA-RS4000 achieves a 65 percent reduction in size compared to conventional projectors in the same class. Generous horizontal and vertical lens shift capabilities permit flexible projector positioning, and its stackable design allows for applications such as 3D. Ethernet and RS-232C interfaces allow projector installation and adjustment from a PC-based Web browser for multiple units, plus an e-mail function can send out status messages and lamp replacement reminders.

 ”The DLA-RS4000 4K projector is the ultimate projector for discerning home theater enthusiasts,” said Jack Faiman, vice president, Visual Systems Division, JVC U.S.A.. “Not only does it produce amazing images for movies, sports, and video games, but its smaller footprint and incredible flexibility make it the ideal premium home theater projector for custom installations. Plus, despite all its high-end features, its user-friendly interface makes it easy to sit back and enjoy the view.”

 The DLA-RS-4000 projector has a suggested list price of $175,000 and will be available October 2009 .  JVC Visual Systems Division introduces its new DLA-RS4000 Reference Series 4K home cinema projector at CEDIA Expo, September. 10-13 at the Georgia World Conference Center in Atlanta. The system is being showcased in the JVC D-ILA Theater in the Omni Hotel North Tower throughout the duration of the CEDIA Expo. Based on the same projection engine used in advanced simulation systems, it provides the superior imagery as well as installation flexibility required by uncompromising home theater consumers. This system is ISF and THX* certified.

 Three newly developed ultra high definition 4K2K D-ILA devices allow the DLA-RS4000 to deliver a 10 megapixel image with a native resolution of 4,096 x 2,400—more than four times the resolution of HD. Up to four screens with full HD or WUXGA resolution images can be displayed simultaneously .

 A new optical design provides 3500 ANSI lumens from a Xenon lamp and delivers excellent color rendering. Lamp power can be adjusted in eight steps for the ideal brightness for a variety of home theater settings and screen sizes. In addition, new Wire Grid polarizers in the optical engine that minimize light leakage are combined with new liquid crystal technology and a novel liquid crystal orientation to significantly reduce off-state light, resulting in a 10,000:1 native contrast ratio.

 The RSVP4 custom digital video processing unit serves as a signal switching, scaling and processing hub for virtually any video source, including Blu-ray and gaming systems, cable and satellite receivers, and DVD players. The RSVP4 has a special feature enabling certified calibration specialists to calibrate either of two custom gamut memories based on the installation’s specific requirements. This enables each system to achieve an accurate color space for the source material being shown. Other features include audio delay compensation, and three separate gamma tables for customization of various image sources and viewing environments. The DLA-RS4000 is shipped complete with a JVC high quality projection zoom lens to maximize performance in almost any home theater setting.

 Despite its advanced performance, the 110-pound DLA-RS4000 achieves a 65 percent reduction in size compared to conventional projectors in the same class. Generous horizontal and vertical lens shift capabilities permit flexible projector positioning, and its stackable design allows for applications such as 3D. Ethernet and RS-232C interfaces allow projector installation and adjustment from a PC-based Web browser for multiple units, plus an e-mail function can send out status messages and lamp replacement reminders.

 ”The DLA-RS4000 4K projector is the ultimate projector for discerning home theater enthusiasts,” said Jack Faiman, vice president, Visual Systems Division, JVC U.S.A.. “Not only does it produce amazing images for movies, sports, and video games, but its smaller footprint and incredible flexibility make it the ideal premium home theater projector for custom installations. Plus, despite all its high-end features, its user-friendly interface makes it easy to sit back and enjoy the view.”

 The DLA-RS-4000 projector has a suggested list price of $175,000 and will be available October 2009 .